Pink means no. Blue means yes.

Okay, so it’s been a darn long time I’ve banged the keyboard. Ergo, pardon me for grammarly faux pas and what nots. I’ve been meaning to get back to my ‘I care a rat’s ass’ mode of writing for a while. So, here goes.

Of late, I’ve noticed how the narrative surrounding the entire concept of ‘Feminism’ has received a rather noteworthy boost thanks to heavy weight movie stars throwing their weight behind ’causes’ with little care about ‘effects’. Except the Box Office variety. Aniruddha Roychowdhury or Tony (da – the ‘da’ is added to the name by all and sundry. Case in point – Facebook tags saying ‘Tony da, well done’, ‘Thank you Tony da for making such a wonderful movie’, ‘Kudos to Tony da for a private screening of the movie’ etc etc.). Yes, Tony directed this dark tale of what it is to be a woman in today’s world. The movie goes by the name of Pink and stars, oh, who else, Amitabh Bachchan and Amitabh Bachchan and Amitabh Bachchan and….

Simple story – 3 chicks go for some concert and later are invited by random boys (among them, one bloke was known to one of the chicks – yes, a Bong guy with a timid face and chicken guts) for ‘dinner and drinks’. They happily go click clacking with them to some random ‘resort’, sexydress, highheels, redlips, the works. Trouble begins when the chaps start misbehaving with them, even molesting them. Because hey, Haryanvi means that type, no? One of the girls reciprocate by breaking an alcohol bottle on one guy’s head and injuring him. He is left with a bloody eye. That’s where the movie starts.

The three girls are on a roller coaster horror ride as they plunge into deep depression as the life force is sucked out from them with constant threats from the boys – via telephones, stalking and even kidnapping. It’s simple, they want to teach the trio a lesson for messing with their manhood and inflated male egos. Amitabh Bachchan’s baritone intervenes as the messianic deliverer. When one of the girls is falsely accused of attempt to murder and soliciting, AB raises his voice and delves right into theatrics as only he can do best. He adds to the film what I believe is a great tagline and a great way of introducing a tagline to any campaign – NO MEANS NO. In the end, we are proven the following:

  • That Haryanvi guys are feudal as shit because they don’t like their womenfolk to party and drink with men.
  • That it’s cool for girls to go out with complete strangers for drinks because in the end, they will all be rescued by men like Deepak Sehgal (played by AB).
  • That in a courtroom, emotion outweighs evidence. The louder or deeper your voice, the better are your chances of winning a case.
  • That lines like “Are you a virgin?” and “You are a woman of questionable character” especially when mouthed by Amitabh Bachchan would make the movie a must-see.
  • That a director can, needlessly insert ’causes’ without pauses in a film to claim moral high ground. Case in point – in the movie the girl from Meghalaya, Andrea Tariang, had to actually say – “I think girls from the North East are subjected to more emotional torture than other girls.” Sorry Tony, this was quite obvious and you needn’t have had her say this out. Unless you think your audience is a bunch of morons.
  • That the role of Amitabh Bachchan could have been and SHOULD have been played by a woman.
  • That short skirts, jeans and sexydress combined with drinking out with guys is a staple of modernity. The Haryanvi guys are feudal because a) they’re Haryanvi and b) they can’t stand women with ‘Western values’.
  • That the chodu of a guy – one called Vishwa who was the only guy known to the girls – had to be a Bong because hey – Bongs are chodu, right?
  • That the name of the movie Pink is so because it tries to overturn the notion of gender stereotyping by doing just that. Just why the movie Mardaani was called Mardaani. Because it couldn’t have been called Auratiya.
  • That Dhritiman Chatterjee should probably not act any more. I had my heart go out to him whenever I heard his quivering voice.
  • That when a woman says NO, she means… well, NO. (If you’re in the mood for love, respect when your girl tells you NO. Because, she means NO. But if she’s in the mood for love, NEVER SAY NEVER because then, you’re insulting her.)
  • The way the girls looked and dressed spoke volumes how the director stereotyped them in his own mind. Falak Ali in ethnic wear, kurtis, nose pin – mandatory because hey, her surname’s Ali. You get the drift? Andrea with short hair and piercings because North East, right? Minal – I didn’t even notice her. She can’t act to save her life.

I am being fiercely critical about this movie, I know. Not because it’s forced. As most movies wrapped in the garb of CAUSE happen to be. (Udta Punjab). But because of the easy manner in which the entire courtroom was swayed to the theatrics of a retired attorney whose only defense was an emotionally charged baritone thundering into the passageways and corridors. Sadly, this movie has seemed to have given an impetus to a false notion of feminism that most women bandy around these days.

Next time, Tony, let me see a female lawyer defend these girls. And with evidence. Not emotions. Yes.

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One thought on “Pink means no. Blue means yes.

  1. Most of this I agree with. Especially the part about a female lawyer. It’s a shabby movie. In every respect. Although so much was discussed in the courtroom, the incident where Minal was picked up in a van and molested was never even brought to the surface. The movoe truly does stereotype every goddamned thung that can be stereotyped and is in many ways incomplete. That being said, the movie however brought to the masses a popular role model (unfortunately male) a point of view, an opinion that needed to be voiced.

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